The 10 Best Cheap Eats in London that All Budgets Should Try

London may be an expensive city, but eating good food at an attractive price is just a case of knowing where to look.

The city is absolutely packed to the rafters with jolly good eats, from your celebrity chef-owned restaurants dripping in Michelin stars to your family-run bistros. Honestly though, you don’t need to dig too deep into your pockets here in London to find decently priced bites to devour… in fact, the hardest part of collating this post was choosing what to leave out! Dive on in and let’s explore our 10 favorite cheap eats in London for under £10—an absolute bargain, every single one. 

A guide to where to find the best cheap eats in London

Cheap eats in North London

1. £5 lamb tagine at Le Rif

A cafe that wouldn’t look out of place in the souks of Marrakech, Le Rif (172–182 Seven Sisters Road) graces the thoroughly local hinterlands off Seven Sisters Road and has a menu with prices will make you do a double take. Sip on mint tea while enjoying properly made tagine of lamb with prunes and cinnamon… or basically any other variety of tagine you can think of. It’s not fancy, but it most definitely is tasty.

Tube stop: Finsbury Park 

Le Rif, home to some of the best cheap eats in London
Le Rif offers a local London vibe and an exotic ambiance all at once. Photo credit: Ewan Munro

2. £3.80 dal and rice at the Indian YMCA Dining Hall

Those in the know do not need the concept-heavy modern Indian restaurants down in the West End when, tucked away around the corner, you find the dining hall of the Indian YMCA. With low prices in a canteen setting, it’s authentic and it’s available to non-guests for lunch and dinner services most days of the week. If it’s meat you’re hankering for alongside your spiced lentils, the three tandoori chicken pieces for £5 should do the trick. 

Tube stop: Warren Street

Cheap eats in South London

3. £7.50 roti jerk chicken wrap at Rudie’s

We adore Rudie’s so much that we even visit it on our London Bridge and Southwark Food Tour. It’s home to super nice staff and authentic tastes of the Caribbean, from saltfish and ackee to curry goat, all very well priced. For unbelievable bang for your buck, opt for their signature jerk chicken in a roti wrap with slaw, crunchy salad and a kick of homemade hot sauce. Sunny island vibes, even on the wettest of days. 

Tube stop: London Bridge 

Rudie's stall at Borough Market, London
Rudie’s brings the flavors of Jamaica to the heart of London.

4. £5.40 pie, double mash and liquor at Goddards at Greenwich

This dish is an absolute classic here in London and we all have our favorite pie shops to visit. Visit Goddards and you can guarantee you’re in safe hands: this family has been bringing the goods since 1890 and their liquor (not alcohol, but secret recipe green parsley sauce) is some of the tastiest around.

Tube stop: Cutty Sark DLR 

Pie, mash and liquor
Few foods are as quintessentially English as the classic combo of pie, mash and liquor. Photo credit: Ungry Young Man

Cheap eats in East London

5. £9.95 rare beef bun hue at Viet Hoa

One of the pioneer restaurants on London’s so-called “Pho Mile,” Viet Hoa was founded by refugees who fled to London to escape the Vietnam War. With lines out the door on certain days, their bun hue is game-changing—imagine pho, but spicy with heavy hits of lemongrass and shrimp paste. We are here for it all day. 

Tube stop: Hoxton 

6. £8.40 full English breakfast at E Pellicci

Family-run for more than a century? Check. Housed in a Grade II-listed building? Check. Absolutely gut-busting full English breakfast with all the trimmings for a knock-out price? Check. E Pellicci really does have it all—and it doesn’t hurt that, as an Italian family, their amazing pastas are cheap as chips, too. When you know, you know. 

Tube stop: Bethnal Green 

Full English breakfast
Nothing hits the spot quite like a hearty full English.

Cheap eats in West London

7. £6.50 shrimp dumpling noodle soup at Cafe TPT

This tiny, blink-and-you’ll-miss-it joint (21 Wardour St.) on the edge of Soho’s Chinatown is a must for hawker-style dishes, from char siu pork and rice to chow mein. It’s is a welcome flashback to the old school Chinatown of 10 years ago and stays open until 1 a.m. for the post-pub munchies. 

Tube stop: Piccadilly Circus 

8. £7.20 customizable box at Grain Shop

A Notting Hill stalwart, this predominantly vegetarian hole-in-the-wall (269A Portobello Road) is worth the journey from any part of town, as evidenced by the lines of locals every day at lunchtime. Choose what you would like from the daily changing dishes to take out or eat at the little counter. Our pick: a cauliflower cheese, dal, roasted new potatoes and as many veggies as can fit in the box—a surprisingly satisfying combo. 

Tube stop: Ladbroke Grove 

Cheap eats in The City (the square mile technically known as the City of London) 

9. £5.50 Philly cheesesteak baguette at Porterford Butchers

A top-notch butchers on Cannon Street since 1983, Porterford is a go-to for brilliant bangers and luscious lamb chops—and they even have a hot food counter. With a vast array of hot sandwiches to take out, our (small amount of) money is on the one filled with beautiful short-rib beef, Monterey Jack cheese and stacks of grilled onions. 

Tube stop: St Pauls 

10. £9 beef and truffle ravioli at Scarpetta

With a name that refers to the “little shoe” of bread with which Italians like to mop up particularly delectable sauces, Scarpetta must go through countless loaves with dishes this good. Changing its menu with the seasons, using only the very best quality pasta and all dishes priced around the £10 mark or below, this is an absolute must if knocking around the city end of London Bridge. You’re welcome! 

Tube stop: Monument

Want to discover even more British culinary classics? Our new online experience, Discover England’s History Through 10 Dishes with Shabby, is calling your name. Join a born-and-bred Londoner for a look at the bites that have shaped the story of England throughout the centuries—and learn why English food is anything but bland and uninspired.

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